Shillito A. M. Digital Crafts: Industial Technologies for Applied Artists and Designer Makers. 2013

This book by Ann Marie Shillito has been published in October 2013 by Bloomsbury. The first heading of the introduction reads, ‘Don’t be intimidated!’ and serves as Shillito’s motivational motto for the interested maker who is on the verge to engage with digital technologies. ‘I want this book to empower, knowing that engagement with and access to digital technologies will continue to improve and that as designer makers we have exceptional knowledge and expertise to take full advantage of all the means available to enhance our practice.’

Digital crafts cover sml

A practicing designer/maker with a background as a jeweller, Shillito is also the founder of Anarkik3D developer of the 3D modelling product Cloud9. This software enables the user to employ haptic feedback – with a force feedback device – to model virtual 3D objects using also their sense of touch. (I was priveledged to tested an early prototype of this system – it had also stereo-scopic vision co-located with the users real gestural positions).

I like the fact that this complex and multifaceted theme is introduced by an experienced maker. In writing this book, Shillito has also included the voices and works of 45 international contributors who have included digital technologies together with their practice to various degrees.

Being image rich, this book makes it easy to see the diverse opportunities digital technologies have to offer for craft and design practitioners. It takes an honest look as to what would be requried from a maker to access these opportunities. The investment in acquiring the necessary skills is significant. A chapter each is given to 2D and 3D technologies and there distinct applications. Chapter 6 ‘Accessing digital technologies’ might be of particular interest to the novice digital/maker.

Chapter 2, ‘A craft-minded approach’, touches on important questions for contemporary making that sees traditional disciplines becoming less defined through the very technologies that hold so much potential for them. This chapter sets the context against which this book draws its value. It canvases the value of the skills and approaches unique to the designer/maker that both inform the output the creative works as well as the development/application of these digitally-based processes.

I have been familiar with all the technologies introduced in Digital Crafts and have used a fair part of them directly. While all aspects are illustrated with completed works by competent digital Designer/makers, I would have been interested to see how some of these works progressed from conception to realisation.

Digital Craft is certainly a worthwhile resource for anyone interested in the contemporary Designer/Maker model as well as the current state of digital manufacturing and the processes required to access them.

Link to Anarkik3D

Time line digital fabrication, web2

The attached image shows a timeline starting about 30 years ago listing relevant developments and services for my project.

Image

Curve/Curve gold, new folded form

Formed by a combination of digitally controlled and manual processes, this work can decorate a wall as well as a table. A CNC router cuts the pattern I designed, guiding the manual deformation of the aluminium composite material into a 3d form. This material is lightweight, durable and colourfast, all qualities that make them ideal for creating lasting individually designed works.

More images of objects in this series here.

Curve/Curve gold, 585 x 480 x 75mm

Curve/Curve gold back

Curve/Curve gold back detail

Knicks LED light, use of digital fabrication for design prototyping

This light was in the making for a long time and is now finally completed. See earlier post. Its design includes several digital fabrication processes like laser cutting (acrylic and brass) and rapid prototyping (gold-plated stainless steel) using Ponoko‘s distributed manufacturing system. All metal surfaces are gold plated taking advantage of Ponoko’s US based production hub which offers rapid prototyping directly into metal.

Its dimensions are: 600 x 150 x 710 mm and the light head holds four 1watt LED’s.

More lights of this series here.

Image

Image

Image

de sign ed 2, opened

The images below are of a showcase exhibition of the Design Arts at the ANU School of Art’s gallery in Canberra, Australia. Amongst the 19 exhibitors were four finalists of this year’s IDEA awards, three winners of the Bombay Sapphire Design Award and two winners of the Canberra 100 Design awards – all alumni from the School of Art. This exhibition was opened to a full house by Brian Parkes, CEO of the Jam Factory, Adelaide. This exhibition will be on show till 25 August 2012.

de sign ed 2 catalogue (1MB)

de sign ed 2 overview 2

de sign ed 2 overview

Image

de sign ed 2 overview 2

de sign ed 2 overview 3

de sign ed 2 overview 3

Jon Goulder, Calypso Lounch, de sign ed 2

Henry Pilcher, lights, de sign ed 2

Brian Parkes (Opener CEO Jam Factory), Gordon Bull (Head of School), Gilbert Riedelbauch (Design Arts Coordinator)

Brian Parkes (Opener CEO Jam Factory), Gordon Bull (Head of School), Gilbert Riedelbauch (Design Arts Coordinator)

Jewellery on table

Jewellery on table

de sign ed 2 showcasing the design arts

This exciting exhibition will be opening on Thursday 2 August at the School of Art gallery in Canberra at the Australian National University. The opener will be Brian Parks, director Jam Factory in Adelaide.

Image

Works by the following designer/makers are presented in this show:

Elliot Bastianon, furniture
Sean Booth, metal
Simon Cottrell, metal
Cesar Cueva, metal
Janet DeBoos, ceramics
Nadège Desgenètez, glass
Ashley Eriksmoen, furniture
Robert Foster, lights
Jon Goulder, furniture
Megan Jackson, textile
Johannes Kuhnen, metal
Cinnamon Lee, metal
Rohan Nicol, lights
Henry Pilcher, lights
Phoebe Porter, metal
Gilbert Riedelbauch, metal
Blanche Tilden, metal/glass
Annie Trevillian, textile
Henry Wilson, furniture

The catalog includes a welcome by  the head of school, Gordon Bull and an essay about the design arts by Anne Brennan the head of the Art Theory department. Here is a link to a pdf version of the catalogue.

ur QR

I am getting quite fond of QR (quick reference) codes. These strange square pattern link the ‘real’ world to information or places in cyperspace. You can ‘read’ them with your smart phone – I use the iPhone app QRReader – or create them with their phone or on a website like qrstuff. Such a code can assist with promoting professional practice and can find its way on your business and invitation cards as well as your email signature block.

Here is a QR code linking straight to my new website.

(Either scan it with a QR reader or just click on it)

Image


images of work

curve straight gold 1 1024

curve-curve red

Wave two line 1

More Photos

categories


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.