Archive for the 'led' Category

de sign ed 2, opened

The images below are of a showcase exhibition of the Design Arts at the ANU School of Art’s gallery in Canberra, Australia. Amongst the 19 exhibitors were four finalists of this year’s IDEA awards, three winners of the Bombay Sapphire Design Award and two winners of the Canberra 100 Design awards – all alumni from the School of Art. This exhibition was opened to a full house by Brian Parkes, CEO of the Jam Factory, Adelaide. This exhibition will be on show till 25 August 2012.

de sign ed 2 catalogue (1MB)

de sign ed 2 overview 2

de sign ed 2 overview

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de sign ed 2 overview 2

de sign ed 2 overview 3

de sign ed 2 overview 3

Jon Goulder, Calypso Lounch, de sign ed 2

Henry Pilcher, lights, de sign ed 2

Brian Parkes (Opener CEO Jam Factory), Gordon Bull (Head of School), Gilbert Riedelbauch (Design Arts Coordinator)

Brian Parkes (Opener CEO Jam Factory), Gordon Bull (Head of School), Gilbert Riedelbauch (Design Arts Coordinator)

Jewellery on table

Jewellery on table

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de sign ed 2 showcasing the design arts

This exciting exhibition will be opening on Thursday 2 August at the School of Art gallery in Canberra at the Australian National University. The opener will be Brian Parks, director Jam Factory in Adelaide.

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Works by the following designer/makers are presented in this show:

Elliot Bastianon, furniture
Sean Booth, metal
Simon Cottrell, metal
Cesar Cueva, metal
Janet DeBoos, ceramics
Nadège Desgenètez, glass
Ashley Eriksmoen, furniture
Robert Foster, lights
Jon Goulder, furniture
Megan Jackson, textile
Johannes Kuhnen, metal
Cinnamon Lee, metal
Rohan Nicol, lights
Henry Pilcher, lights
Phoebe Porter, metal
Gilbert Riedelbauch, metal
Blanche Tilden, metal/glass
Annie Trevillian, textile
Henry Wilson, furniture

The catalog includes a welcome by  the head of school, Gordon Bull and an essay about the design arts by Anne Brennan the head of the Art Theory department. Here is a link to a pdf version of the catalogue.

CAD to gold-plated stainless steel

Web-based fabrication has gotten even more exciting with a new material/process offered through the Ponoko system. Getting computer models ‘printed’ in 3D using online rapid prototyping processes is established but having the CAD parts arrive in stainless steel with a gorgeous rich gold coat is quite something.

ponoko stainless steel gold-plated parts

This new material/process is offered through the US hub and is equally as easy to order as the 2d laser-cutting service. I found that dimensions ‘shrink’ slightly eg holes I had modeled as 3.9 mm turned out to be 3.4 mm in the finished parts. Being mostly stainless steel (with some bronze wicked into it) it proved very difficult to drill the holes to the right size. High speed drill bits (even titanium tipped) are blunt after drilling only 6mm deep. Reducing the speed from the recommended 1000 rpm to a third helped to improve their staying power slightly. I look forward to the carbon-nitride drill bit I ordered to finally finish the job.

These parts are for a new light using a mix of digitally fabricated and manually made elements. The ‘gold’ parts are intented to connect carbon fiber rods forming the main structure of the design.

design sketch and wire model

Light objects for Art School Library, making

This post describes some technical and making aspects of the Light objects for the ANU School of Art library. You can read more about the design aspects here.

reading pit at ANU School of Art

During the making of these lights a mix of manual and digital fabrication processes have been used.  Brass and aluminium pieces have been laser cut while the translucent red elements had been rapid prototyped by ‘Rapid Pro‘ in Victoria, Australia.

The black curved arms are five 2.5mm layers aluminium, riveted together to create an inside channel concealing the cables up to the brass cylinder. They have been laser cut locally in Canberra by Acuform.  The cylinder forms a central hub from which four conical carbon fiber tubes stretch out and support two light heads on each lamp. The lights have a wingspan of 1.4 meter.

right of two light objects

Each light head has six one-watt LEDs. The LEDs are mounted on a decorative brass cooling plate (cut by Ponoko) and are cooled by a fan. The following parts had been used: LED ring with six one watt LED (LSP6-WW-XXX) and Controller/Driver (MDU9-SC-3570) from Future Electronics. All elements are enclosed by ABS housings. These housings are rapid-prototyped using translucent red FDM material from ‘Stratasys’.

Three views of the light head

Views of light head

The curved aluminium arm extent from the main brass fitting which is strapped onto the existing column with an aluminium strip. This strip has custom brass connectors to adjust the tension of the strapping.

Main bracket and centre bracket

The electronics – led drivers and fan power supplies – are placed inside the void between the column and the main brass fitting. The 12 volt fans are driven by 6 volt power-supplies letting them run without developing noise. Before the installation the lights had been tested for several days.

Obrut colour variations

This image shows some of the possible combination of materials and colours I played with for the 2nd series of this light object. Basically all 3mm materials could be used as a base. Ponoko has many exciting colours in their materials catalog.

Obrut light in different colors. This light is designed by Gilbert Riedelbauch

Obrut light colour variations 1st set

Production of exhibition catalogue made easy

While sorting photos of a recent exhibition using iPhoto on an Apple Mac I explored the ‘book’ option in this free software. After selecting one of the many layout templates it was easy to populate the pages with images. The basic image editing tools in iPhoto also helped to improve the look of the pictures significantly. After tweaking the templates and adding the images and some text, I only needed to press the ‘buy’ button and through my Apple account the prove of my catalog was on its way to be printed. This is just another example of a web2 based production method.

iPhoto-book-highlights-09

iPhoto book interface

The price of about $25 (Australian) for each copy is good if one needs only a few copies instead of hundreds to make a traditional print-run viable. I also used a pdf export of this catalog to get 20 copies printed locally, the price was comparable but the quality of the ‘Apple’ print was superior. You can download (500KB) a low res pdf of this catalog.

I have now a lasting document that helps with promoting my work and a little giveaway for everyone who supported my work. In the process I also registered as a publisher and this booklet has an ISBN. This might sound like a lot of effort for a little 30 page publication, but this catalog documents my recent ‘highlights‘ exhibition, which in turn represented the outcome of an intensive period of research and work as part of my professional practice.

Highlights Exhibitions

My first solo exhibition since 2001 called ‘Highlights’ opened in February 2009 at Craft ACT in Canberra and then in May at Metalab, in Sydney. Many thanks to Catrina Vignando, general manager Craft Australia and Grace Cochran who have opened those shows respectively. Highlights represents a change in my practice with the focus on light objects as well as highlighting how combining making processes (manual, digital and distributed) can address the designer/maker model as a contemporary approach to craft. See earlier post of the design/making of the light ‘Desk 30’.

The exhibitions were well received and successfully set up by Jason Hugonnet, curator and exhibition manager Craft ACT and Cesar Cueva, director of Metalab. Please find Jason Hugonnet’s exhibition review here.

Highlights at CraftACT

Highlights at CraftACT, Canberra, Image by Creative Image Photography

Highlights at metalab, Sydney

Highlights at metalab, Sydney. Image 'Indesignlive.com'


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